Category Archives: Bicyclists

Flatten the Curve Beyond COVID-19

By Leah Walton, NTSB Safety Advocate

When I read the extended nationwide maximum telework order, prolonging the order that started on March 17th, I couldn’t help but think about what impact the COVID-19 preventive measures might have on traffic deaths around the country. Surely, we’ll see a drop in vehicle miles traveled, like we did in the last great recession, but will that give us a false sense of security that traffic safety has improved? The truth is, even though fewer people are driving, and we might see a drop in traffic fatalities in 2020 due to social distancing and stay-at-home orders, risky driving behaviors persist. On one hand, I’ve seen reports of drivers using the emptier-than-normal freeways as their personal racetracks, and on the other, I’ve seen reports of significantly lower drunk driving arrests in the month of March.

It’s encouraging to see so many people following state orders to implement social distancing and staying at home—if there are fewer people on the roads, there is less risk for vehicle-related injuries, which keeps people out of hospitals, allowing hospital workers to focus on the influx of coronavirus patients. However, this causes me to wonder: if people can be convinced to stay home to avoid contracting a dangerous and sometimes deadly virus, could they also be convinced to designate a sober driver or drive their vehicle at posted speeds? After all, those are lifesaving behaviors, as well.

 

As a transportation safety advocate, I know that motor vehicle crashes are a serious threat to public health in the United States. In 2018, 36,560 people were killed in traffic crashes. The Insurance Information Institute estimates that 1,894,000 people were injured in traffic crashes in the same year. According to NHTSA, 94 percent of all serious traffic crashes are the result of human error; or, in other words, they’re caused by a driver’s choices. We should not let the stress of COVID-19 lower our guard on safe driving practices. Remaining vigilant behind the wheel is critical now more than ever with children home from school, often playing outside, riding bikes in the streets. More people are out walking; sometimes in the street to practice social distancing of other pedestrians.

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The CDC has been promoting thorough handwashing procedures and the importance of covering a cough and sanitizing surfaces to prevent the spread of COVID-19. But did you know that the CDC also promotes motor vehicle safety behaviors like driving sober, buckling up, and not driving distracted?

We are extremely troubled by the increasing number of deaths and cases across our country related to COVID-19. Doctors, scientists, and public health professionals are all searching for a cure or a vaccine to eliminate this virus as quickly as possible. At the NTSB, we’re incredibly grateful for all those professionals—including those transporting vital supplies around the country. If Americans can choose to stay home to help slow the spread of COVID-19, imagine the impact we could have if everyone chose to make the safest driving choices for ourselves and our fellow road users. We have the power to flatten the curve of traffic deaths by making safe choices every day.

A Comprehensive Approach to Bicycle Safety

By Member Jennifer Homendy

Last fall, the National Transportation Safety Board released a report that made safety recommendations meant to improve safety for an important and growing segment of users on our roadways – bicyclists. The report issued 12 new safety recommendations and reiterated 10 safety recommendations.

Through NTSB’s 50+ years of accident investigation experience, we’ve long known that complex challenges, like reducing the number of vehicle-bicycle collisions, requires multi-faceted solutions. In the study, we looked at numerous countermeasures, including roadway design and infrastructure, reducing traffic speeds, collision avoidance systems and blind spot detection systems.

Homendy-bikePerhaps that is why I was disappointed to see the controversy within the cycling community surrounding one of the 22 recommendations discussed in the report – the singular recommendation about requiring the use of helmets. That debate overshadowed the many other important recommendations that largely focused on preventing collisions between vehicles and bicyclists in the first place, rather than mitigating their severity. As an avid cyclist myself, I am very aware of the hazards that exist for cyclists and share the community’s concern for improving bicycle safety on U.S. roadways.

Separated bike lanes and bike-friendly intersections are incorporated in the design of just a tiny fraction of U.S. roadways. So, we asked for more. The NTSB recommended that guidance provided to highway engineers, city planners and traffic designers, include resources that will help increase bike-friendly roadway improvements throughout the U.S.

Along with changes in infrastructure, the NTSB found that reducing traffic speeds can reduce the likelihood of fatal or serious bicycle injuries. Lowering speed limits is part of a safe systems approach that was also discussed in our 2017 safety study on reducing speeding-related crashes.

Collision avoidance systems are broadly effective in helping motorists detect and avoid other vehicles and some automakers have begun adding systems to detect bicyclists and pedestrians.  To encourage manufacturers to include these systems in their new vehicles, and to assist auto buyers in making safety-conscious purchasing decisions, the NTSB recommended that bicycle detection systems be incorporated into the 5-Star Safety Ratings.

The NTSB also recommended that newly manufactured large trucks be equipped with blind spot detection systems, because large vehicles have bigger blind spots that make it difficult, or even impossible, in some situations for their drivers to see bicyclists.

And as a Board Member, I will continue to push for the implementation of safety recommendations on the NTSB’s Most Wanted List that would help make streets safer for bicyclists – including eliminating distractions, reducing fatigue-related accidents, ending alcohol and other drug impairment, increasing implementation of collision avoidance systems and reducing speed-related crashes.

Member Homendy Bike Safety Study Board Meeting

Implementation of our recommendations would dramatically improve the safety of our roadways for bicyclists. But prevention or avoidance will sometimes fail and mitigating the severity of crashes will help save lives. That basic premise of transportation safety, supported by data on fatalities from head injuries, prompted our call for helmets for bicyclists.

The NTSB’s approach to bicyclist safety is comprehensive, multi-faceted and fact-based. All the safety recommendations, when implemented, would help save lives by preventing collisions from happening, and by reducing the severity of those that do.