Disconnect this Thanksgiving

By Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt

Before the roads become packed with young adults returning from college, out-of-town visitors arriving, and last-minute trips to the store for that missing item in Aunt Ida’s stuffing, I wanted to get in a few words about focusing on the drive this Thanksgiving.

If you’re driving, put down the phone. Better yet, put it in the glove compartment, or, if you’re driving with others, hand the phone over to someone you trust.

There’s still time before you get on the road to make arrangements; you don’t have to try to settle things while you drive. If you’re driving home from college, make sure that your parents know to leave a message if they call because you’re not answering the phone while driving. And say your goodbyes to your peers at school and not while you drive. Let your friends know in advance that the driver is out of contact until the drive is over, end of story. No texts, no tweets, no e-mails, no calls.

33473719243_d5a456b2dd_o
Chairman Sumwalt talks with survivor advocates at the Act to End Deadly Distractions roundtable 

For you parents: As a parent myself, I know how much we worry. But don’t call your children while they’re driving. Distracting them from the driving task can cause far more heartache than not knowing exactly where they are and how they’re getting along.

Back on the home front: If you need to call back to your house to see if you forgot to stock up on something for the guests, do it from the store parking lot. If you’re a guest on the way and you need to tell your hosts your progress, do it from a rest area.

Thanksgiving is a joyous American holiday, and it kicks off our festive holiday season. While we’re gathering with friends and family to give thanks for all we’ve got, let’s not open ourselves up to a terrible loss.

Mom, dad, kids, sis, boyfriend, girlfriend, fiancée, spouse, buddy… I won’t take your call and I won’t answer your text while I’m on the road. Our connection doesn’t depend on our tweets, text messages, photos, or phone conversations while driving; it’s in our hearts, not our heart emojis. It’s far better to lose the electronic representation of a loved one for a few minutes or hours than to lose a loved one—or cause somebody else to lose a loved one—forever.

Last April, StopDistractions.org, Drive Smart VA, and the National Safety Council worked with the NTSB to present a roundtable, “Act to End Deadly Distractions.” The roundtable brought together survivor advocates with other experts to tell their stories and share tools they’re using in their fight against distracted driving. Some of the survivor advocates at this roundtable will see empty seats this year at the Thanksgiving table. As one of the participants put it, “this isn’t a club any of us wanted to be in. We don’t want to be here; we want to be home with our loved ones . . . that was taken from us.”

Thousands of people “join the club” of distracted driving survivors or victims every year. But this Thanksgiving, we can all act to lower this number and get home safely to our loved ones by disconnecting while we’re driving.

Click on the link to see a few moments from the “Act to End Deadly Distractions” roundtable (just not while you’re driving).

 

Travelers, Put Safety First this Holiday Season

MultiMode_banner

By Chairman Robert L. Sumwalt

At the NTSB, we’ve investigated many tragic transportation accidents that could have been prevented with some planning, forethought, and good decision making. As we mark the beginning of the holiday travel season, we want to encourage all Americans to make it their goal to arrive safely at their destinations, so we’ve boiled down some lessons we’ve learned that the traveling public can use.

By Car

Fatigue, impairment by alcohol and other drugs, and distraction continue to play major roles in highway crashes. Here’s what you can do:

  • If your holiday celebrations involve alcohol, ask a friend or family member to be your designated driver, or call a taxi or ridesharing service.
  • In a crash, seat belts (and proper child restraints) are your best protection. Always make sure that you and all your passengers are buckled up or buckled in!
  • Make sure to use the right restraint for child passengers, and be sure it’s installed correctly. If you have doubts, ask a Certified Child Passenger Safety Technician.
  • Make sure you’re well rested! A fatigued driver is just as dangerous as one impaired by alcohol or other drugs.
  • Avoid distractions. In this newly released video, survivor-advocates share their stories of personal loss—and the changes they’re working for now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jNYECrlzGU&feature=youtube.
  • Don’t take or make calls while driving, even using a hands-free device. Set your navigation system before you start driving. If you’re traveling with others, ask them to navigate.

By Bus or Train

The NTSB has made recommendations to improve passenger rail and motorcoach operations and vehicle crashworthiness, but travelers should know what to do in an emergency.

  • Pay attention to safety briefings and know where the nearest emergency exit is. If it’s a window or roof hatch, make sure you know how to use it.
  • If you’re unsure of where the exits are or how to use them, or if you didn’t receive a safety briefing, ask your driver or the train conductor to brief you.
  • Always use restraints when they’re available!

 By Air or Sea

Airline and water travel have become incredibly safe, but these tips can help keep you and your loved ones safe in an emergency.

  • When flying, make sure that you and your traveling companions have your own seats—even children under age 2.
  • Don’t forget your child’s car seat. The label will usually tell you whether your child car seat is certified for airplane use; the owner’s manual always has this information.
  • If you don’t know the rules for using a child’s car seat on your flight, call the airline and ask what you need to know.
  • Pay close attention to the safety briefing! Airline and marine accidents have become very rare, but you and your family can be safer by being prepared.
  • Whether you’re on an airplane or a boat, know where to find the nearest flotation device.

No matter how you travel, you deserve the benefits of the lessons we’ve learned through our investigations, but you need to play an active part to take advantage of them. This holiday season, make a commitment to put safety first.

 

Episode 4- Clint Johnson

In this episode of Behind-the-Scene @ NTSB, we chat with Clint Johnson, Chief of the Alaska Regional Office, in the Office of Aviation Safety. We discuss the importance of general aviation to the communities in Alaska and the impact of the work done by the NTSB. Clint also shares how he became an Aviation Investigator and what got him interested in aviation.

Johnson_AK
Clint Johnson (right)

Get the latest episode on Apple Podcasts or on Google Play.

And find more ways to listen here: https://www.blubrry.com/behind_the_scene_ntsb/

Thank You for Your Service  

By Nicholas Worrell, Chief, NTSB Safety Advocacy Division

As we honor our veterans this week, I’d first like to acknowledge the many veterans who continue to serve the public here at the NTSB. Thank you for your service. I, too, began my public service in the armed forces as a member of the US Marine Corps. Like many of my NTSB colleagues, my focus then was—and remains—protecting American lives.

And to all American veterans, on behalf of the whole NTSB, thank you for your service. You were ready to stand your post and, if necessary, engage the enemy to protect your country.

A little more than a year ago, I had an opportunity to speak to sailors aboard the USS George Washington about road safety, which, I’ll admit, sounds strange. After all, why do sailors aboard a ship need to hear about road safety? The answer is because today’s military is working hard to stop an epidemic of vehicle crash deaths among its personnel, both off and on duty. For many years, the number of active duty personnel dying in crashes on our roads rivaled the number dying in our wars. Adding in American civilians, we lose over 37,000 Americans on our roads each year. Unintentional roadway injuries are the most likely cause of death for Americans, from childhood through middle age.

USS Washington
Nicholas Worrell talks with sailors about the USS George Washington

On the George Washington, I urged active duty personnel to “stay frosty” (alert) on US roads because, to me, something that kills tens of thousands of Americans a year must be seen as an enemy. This enemy’s three favorite tactics are impairment, distraction, and fatigue. Using the values drilled into me as a Marine—honor, courage, and commitment—I’m working to encourage others to counter these enemy tactics. I’m teaching my fellow citizens that it’s not okay to drink a six‑pack and get on your bike. It’s not okay to take phone calls—handheld or handsfree—while you’re behind the wheel. It’s not okay to drive without any sleep. If you do, you’re as good as collaborating with the enemy.

Body armor and up-armored vehicles keep soldiers and Marines safer, even when they’re in harm’s way. But what keeps you safe from the enemy on the roads at home?

A full FMVSS-218–compliant helmet.

Consistent use of your restraints.

Age-appropriate child car seats.

This is your body armor on the roads; your up-armor for your POV.

For many of us who have transitioned out of the military, our service values still drive us. We know that if there’s an enemy afoot, we are called to confront it. And, for Americans who never wore the uniform, improving road safety can be your chance to serve our country.

This Veterans Day, let’s thank our veterans by keeping each other safe on the roads that they served to defend.

Episode 3- Member T. Bella Dinh-Zarr

In this episode of Behind-the-Scene @ NTSB, we have a conversation with Board Member Bella Dinh-Zarr. Member Dinh-Zarr shares with us her passion for safety and the path she has taken as a public health scientist who is focused on how transportation safety can prevent injuries and fatalities.

Get the latest episode on Apple Podcasts or on Google Play.

And find more ways to listen here: https://www.blubrry.com/behind_the_scene_ntsb/

Episode 2- Member Christopher Hart

In this episode of Behind-the-Scene @ NTSB, we chat with Board Member Christopher Hart. He shares how he got interested in aviation and the path that led to a pilot’s license and law degree. Join us as he shares his unique experience of serving as a Board Member in the 90’s and then again in the 2000’s.

Get the latest episode on Apple Podcasts or on Google Play.

And find more ways to listen here: https://www.blubrry.com/behind_the_scene_ntsb/

Why Teen Driver Safety Week Should be Every Week

By: Nicholas Worrell, Chief, NTSB Safety Advocacy Division

Driving is a privilege that gives us the freedom to go where we want, when we want, with whom we want. The benefits of driving are especially attractive to teenagers. Driving is a milestone for teens, but with great power and freedom comes great responsibility.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teenagers; more teens die in crashes than from drug/alcohol abuse, violence, or disease. In 2016, more than 3,600 teenagers died on our highways, a 4 percent increase from 2015. To address these tragic statistics, the third week of October was designated by Congress as National Teen Driver Safety Week. During this week, advocates, government agencies, communities, and educators aim to promote teen driver safety and eliminate a preventable tragic problem. Especially during this week, we all need to come together to keep simple mistakes from impacting the future of our country.

Today, the NTSB joined the National Organizations for Youth Safety (NOYS) and students from Maryland and Virginia high schools for NOYS’ Youth Interactive Traffic Safety Lab. The event provided hands-on activities for students to learn about a variety of driving safety issues—from auto maintenance and work zone navigation to distracted and impaired driving. Traffic safety experts and community leaders spoke with students about what it means to be a “responsible” driver and the very real consequences of complacency. In a pre-event press conference, NTSB’s Kris Poland, PhD; Maryland’s First Lady Yumi Hogan; Maryland Motor Vehicle Administrator Christine Nizer; and NOYS Interim Executive Director April Rai reminded teens that, while motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, these crashes are preventable. One key message to teens: you have the power to change this reality.

Students also had the opportunity to talk with NTSB investigators and safety advocates to learn about our crash investigations and the safety recommendations we’ve made to improve safety for all road users—especially our recommendations for preventing teen driving crashes and their resulting injuries and deaths.

While events like the NOYS Safety Lab helps to arm students with some of the tools needed to make the right choice, we need the help of parents, other influencing adults, school officials, local government, and community leaders to help make the biggest impact. Parents, in particular, play a critical role. They should have a meaningful discussion with their new driver about the key components of driving and the thinking behind certain driving decisions. Parents must take time to outline the risks associated with driving, such as distractions, fatigue (due either from lack of sleep or fatiguing medications), other impairments, and speeding. Sometimes, making safety a priority requires establishing new priorities in the household and a shift in “family culture.” The best way to promote safety is to practice safety and treat it seriously through education, discussion, and role modeling.

 At the NTSB, we strive every day to advocate safety in the many modes of transportation. Our Most Wanted List of transportation safety improvements is designed to address our most critical safety issues. We are successful when people engage, learn strategies to improve the lives of themselves and those around them, and execute these strategies to save lives and prevent injuries. I urge you to become an advocate—not only this week, but every week—for driving safely.

 

If you have any questions about teen driving or NTSB advocacy activities in this area, email SafetyAdvocacy@NTSB.gov. We also encourage you to follow us on Twitter @NTSB and Facebook and Instagram @NTSBgov.

 

 

The Official Blog of the NTSB Chairman

%d bloggers like this: