Episode 7- Eric Weiss

In this episode of Behind-the-Scene @NTSB, we get to chat with Public Affairs Specialist Eric Weiss. He shares with us how he has always had a passion for transportation and how that passion brought him to the NTSB.

Eric-Erik-Stephanie
Eric Weiss (l), Erik Strickland (center), and Stephanie Shaw (r) tape Behind-the-Scene @NTSB. 

Get the latest episode on Apple Podcasts or on Google Play.

And find more ways to listen here: https://www.blubrry.com/behind_the_scene_ntsb/

Thank You

SafetyCompassLogoBy Stephanie D. Shaw

We launched Safety Compass in March 2011 to provide you an inside-out view of the investigative and advocacy efforts we’re engaged in and the important safety issues we’re focused on. As we close out 2017, we want to say “thank you” to you, our readers. Thank you for your interest in the work we do and for sharing our safety messages and recommendations for improving transportation safety.

From teens and sleep to drones, autonomous vehicles to our investigative processes, we’ve given you an inside look at the NTSB and highlighted our comprehensive approach to improving transportation safety across all modes and for all people.

To wrap up the year, here’s a list of some of our most popular blogs of 2017:

Last month, we released data revealing that 2,030 more people died in transportation accidents in 2016 than in 2015. Of those fatalities, 95 percent occurred on the nation’s roadways. Many of those deaths were completely preventable! As we approach 2018, we call on each of you to help us reverse the trend of increasing transportation fatalities, especially on our roadways. Continue to read our blog, see the lessons we’ve learned through our investigations, and share the safety recommendations we’ve made to prevent transportation accidents and crashes, deaths, and injuries.

We encourage you to keep up not only with our blogs, but with other NTSB materials. Sign up to be on our Constant Contact list. Follow us on Facebook (@NTSBgov), Instagram (@NTSBgov), LinkedIn (@NTSB), and Twitter (@NTSB). And in case you missed it, we launched a podcast in 2017, too! Check out Behind-the-Scene @NTSB wherever you get your podcasts. If you’d like to suggest a blog topic, e-mail SafetyAdvocacy@ntsb.gov.

As 2017 comes to an end, we again extend our gratitude to you for working with us to improve transportation safety. We wish you safe travels this holiday season and in 2018.

National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

By: Member T. Bella Dinh-Zarr, PhD, MPH

Many Americans are now well into holiday shopping—some may already have finished. Kids have made up their wish lists and excitement is building around what gifts will be arriving. Every year, there seems to be a new trending gift that flies off the shelves. Whether it’s the latest stuffed animal or a remote-controlled toy, the joyous looks on the faces of children who open these gifts are priceless.

One trend that is never joyous, especially around the holidays, that no one wants to be a part of, is the increasing number of impaired driving deaths. This number has been trending upward over the past few years; what’s even sadder is that it could—and should—be zero. Impaired driving fatalities are 100% preventable.

According to NHTSA, over 150 more people died in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes in 2016 than in 2015 (10,320 to 10,497). That was an increase of 1.7%. And, sadly, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 out of 5 motor vehicle deaths of children involve an alcohol‑impaired driver, most often someone driving the child.

December has been designated National Impaired Driving Prevention Month to draw attention to the problem of drunk and drugged driving and how it can be prevented. Between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, Americans attend holiday celebrations of all kinds. Many involve alcohol, and often the amount of alcohol individuals consume isn’t monitored. This can lead to impaired driving if plans for a sober ride home aren’t made in advance.

At the NTSB, we have issued specific recommendations that, if implemented, could save you or someone you know from an impaired driver. Policies such as all-offender ignition interlocks, .05 (or below) per se blood alcohol concentration limits, and high-visibility enforcement campaigns can prevent impaired driving.

These policy actions aim for broad acceptance of a personal choice: Drink or drive, but don’t do both. The same goes for drugs, whether illicit or legal. We can simply decide that driving should be separated from drinking (and the use of other drugs). Impairment and driving should never mix. If you’re planning to drink, plan to have a sober ride home. If you’re driving, take that responsibility seriously; be the sober ride for others and don’t drink at all!  Also if you’ve driven somewhere and then later decide to drink, use public transportation, call a taxi (or a friend), or use a ride app to get home safely. It’s pretty simple: If you have a phone (and often even if you don’t), you have a ride. We each have the power to eliminate impaired driving if we choose to never get behind the wheel when we are impaired.

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If any of this sounds to you like advice from the Grinch, think for a moment about what sober driving would mean, not just for this holiday, but every day. More than 10,000 people die each year because someone drives impaired. Imagine the joy never stolen from family celebrations if all of us made—and kept—plans to have a sober ride home during the holidays. Imagine the pain we could spare families not just during the holidays, but every day. Imagine how many families would remain intact and who wouldn’t have to suffer through the holidays remembering loved ones who were lost at the hands of an impaired driver.

On behalf of the NTSB, please have a safe—and joyful—holiday.

The Silver Bridge Collapse: Don’t Blame the Mothman!

 

By Don Karol

Rumor has it that, just before the December 15, 1967, collapse of the US Highway 35 Bridge in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, a 7-foot-tall monster with large, piercing red eyes and huge, mothlike wings was seen lurking nearby, warning of the impending catastrophe. This “Mothman” was soon blamed for the tragedy in which 46 people died and 9 were injured. Of the 37 vehicles on the bridge at the time of the collapse, 31 fell with it, many plunging into the Ohio River. Fifty years after the collapse of what was then known as the Silver Bridge, paranormal speculation still swirls around the event, perpetuated by movies (like the Mothman Prophecies), legends, and myths. As a civil engineer, though, I put my trust in the laws of physics, materials science, and the findings of the NTSB investigation completed five decades ago, which proved without a doubt that the Mothman wasn’t to blame.

Silver Bridge, Point Pleasant, West Virginia
Section of Silver Bridge, Point Pleasant, West Virginia, that collapsed on December 15, 1967 (source: Herald-Dispatch)

The Silver Bridge collapse was the first significant highway accident investigation in NTSB history. Working with experts from the Federal Highway Administration, the states of West Virginia and Ohio, and leading engineering consulting firms, we determined conclusively that the cause of the collapse was an eyebar fracture in one of the bridge’s suspension chains. The fracture resulted from stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue that had developed over the bridge’s 40-year lifespan. Not surprisingly, no evidence was ever found connecting the Mothman to the failure.

This catastrophic event prompted national concern about the safety of bridges across the United States. President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered all US bridges to undergo safety inspections. Congressional hearings resulted in mandates requiring the US Department of Transportation to develop and implement National Bridge Inspection Standards. In December 1970, landmark legislation was enacted that established national requirements for bridge inspection and evaluation. One would think that these rigorous new inspection standards would take care of bridge failures forever. Unfortunately, during the past half century, that’s not been the case.

1983 bridge collapse in Greenwich CT
A 100-foot-long section of the Interstate 95 bridge over the Mianus River in Greenwich, Connecticut, collapsed June 29, 1983 (source: Bob Child, Associated Press)

On June 28, 1983, a 100-foot-long section of Interstate 95 (Mianus River Bridge) collapsed near Greenwich, Connecticut. Two tractor-semitrailers and two passenger vehicles went down with it, resulting in three fatalities and three serious injuries. We determined that corrosion-induced forces led to lateral displacement of the suspension assembly, which went undetected by the state’s bridge inspection and maintenance programs and ultimately led to the collapse.

On April 5, 1987, tragedy struck again when two spans of the New York State Thruway (Interstate 90) fell about 80 feet into the rain-swollen Schoharie Creek. Four passenger cars and one tractor-semitrailer plunged into the creek, and 10 people were killed. We determined that the New York State Thruway Authority failed to maintain adequate support around the bridge piers, leading to severe erosion in the soil beneath the bridge footings. We also determined that the state’s bridge inspection program was inadequate. Not surprisingly, neither the Mothman nor the Loch Ness Monster was seen in advance of this collapse to forewarn of the impending catastrophe.

1987 bridge collapse near Amsterdam, New York
Divers search for victims in the Schoharie Creek after the New York State Thruway bridge collapsed near Amsterdam, New York, on April 5, 1987 (source: Fred McKinney, Times Union)

Other notable bridge failures we investigated in the late 1980s involved localized flooding and water scouring. One collapse occurred on April 1, 1989, near Covington, Tennessee, when two columns supporting three bridge spans collapsed, sending an 85‑foot section of the US Route 51 bridge 20 feet into the Hatchie River. Five vehicles fell with it, killing eight occupants. Again, our investigation identified deficiencies in the state authority’s bridge oversight. In response to our investigations of these events, additional requirements were developed for periodic underwater inspection of bridges.

Probably the most memorable bridge collapse we investigated occurred 10 years ago in Minneapolis, Minnesota, when a catastrophic failure occurred in the main span of the deck truss in the Interstate 35W highway bridge. As a result, 1,000 feet of the deck truss collapsed during rush hour, with about 456 feet of the main span falling into the river. A total of 111 vehicles were on the portion of the bridge that collapsed; 13 people died and 145 were injured. We determined that a design error in the gusset plates compromised the bridge’s load capacity, causing it to fail under substantial weight increases. Our investigation prompted the development of additional bridge quality assurance and improved bridge inspection requirements.

2007 bridge collapse in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Interstate 35W bridge over the Mississippi River collapsed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on August 1, 2007 (source: Peter Matthews, Polaris)

On December 15, as we mark the 50th anniversary of the Silver Bridge collapse, let’s focus on the infrastructure improvements we need still need to make five decades later rather than try to place the blame on mythical creatures like the Mothman. Throughout the NTSB’s history, we have investigated catastrophic bridge collapses with one goal in mind: preventing future tragedies. Despite efforts to continually enhance the quality of bridge inspections, unforeseen disasters continue to occur, highlighting the need to thoroughly inspect and replace bridges before they collapse. Supernatural forces do not bring down bridges; neglect does.

 

Don Karol is a Senior Highway Accident Investigator and National Resource Specialist in the NTSB Office of Highway Safety.

Episode 6- Stephanie Matonek

In this episode of Behind-the-Scene @ NTSB, we chat with Transportation Disaster Assistance Specialist, Stephanie Matonek. She discusses how she found her passion for the work that she does as part of the TDA team and path she took to get to where she is now. She also has a piece of interesting NTSB history that she shares with us.

Erik and Stephanie
Erik Strickland (l) interviews Stephanie Matonek (r) for Behind-the-Scene @NTSB

Get the latest episode on Apple Podcasts or on Google Play.

And find more ways to listen here: https://www.blubrry.com/behind_the_scene_ntsb/

How Employers Can Make Our Roads Safer

By Member T. Bella Dinh-Zarr, PhD, MPH 

“Safety should not be a competitive advantage.”

That’s the message I keep in mind every time I visit groups that represent employers, like the Network of Employers for Transportation Safety (NETS) which focuses on highway safety, or when I meet with the executives at individual companies, who may use many different modes of transportation for their businesses.

The NTSB is a unique federal agency because we are completely independent. Our agency has one simple but noble purpose: to prevent transportation-related deaths and injuries. We are on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, to investigate accidents, assist victims’ families, develop factual records, and recommend changes to make transportation safer. Unlike many government agencies, the NTSB has no regulatory authority, and we have no financial incentives to promote our safety recommendations. Our daily decision-making is guided by our values of integrity, transparency, independence, and excellence. We undertake investigations and make recommendations for the sole purpose of preventing future transportation disasters.

CMVSInfographicEmployers are uniquely positioned to meaningfully advance the recommendations that we make at the NTSB.  Over the years, we’ve issued over 14,000 safety recommendations to over 2,300 recipients, many of which are employers or groups that represent them. We know that if employers voluntarily implement our recommendations, our transportation system will be much safer. We’ve issued business-relevant recommendations related to installing recorder technology, developing fatigue management plans, requiring medical fitness, and many more—most of which are on our Most Wanted List (MWL).

Employers have a responsibility to address transportation safety. Nowhere is this more evident than for employers with vehicle fleets.  Many employers develop policies and procedures to keep their staff safe on the roads because they know that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among workers in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, from 2003–2015, there were more than 23,000 work-related motor vehicle deaths in the United States. The issues on our MWL, if addressed by employers, can help reduce this unfortunate statistic.

One way employers have helped advance safety—and can continue to do so—is by promoting evidence-based interventions like lowering the illegal BAC (blood alcohol concentration) to .05 (g/dL) or lower and implementing primary seat belt laws in the communities they serve. More than 10,000 people die in alcohol-related crashes every year. We’ve recently received attention because of our efforts to end impaired driving and our recommendation to change BAC laws from .08 to .05 BAC or lower. Many peer-reviewed studies have shown that such a law would prevent impaired‑driving crashes. While commercial drivers already are required to comply with a .04 BAC limit, employers can be an important influence in the lives of their employees, as well as in the communities in which they operate, by educating their employees and spreading the word about the effectiveness of a .05 BAC law.

Safety-conscious employers were some of the first and most vocal supporters of preventing distracted driving, long before distraction was a popular topic. Good companies didn’t just talk about distracted driving, they took action—as I’ve seen firsthand—to educate their employees and to change polices to prevent distracted driving.

American companies with large fleets also have been some of the most vocal supporters of the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety. They have worked hard to support international road safety, and have contributed to nontraditional traffic safety efforts, like helmet campaigns and infrastructure programs that improve the road environment, especially around schools.

Employers should also consider bringing vehicles with collision avoidance technology into their company fleets. Systems such as collision warning and automatic emergency braking help keep drivers safe by mitigating or even preventing crashes. Employers could install onboard vehicle monitoring systems and recording devices, such as cameras, to help monitor driving activity and unsafe practices. These technologies require an investment, but that investment will go a long way toward reducing insurance and workers’ compensation costs—and ultimately toward preventing injuries and saving lives.

There are many employers already considering and incorporating these technologies to improve safety; however, the more who join these industry leaders, the more lives will be saved. We can’t overstate the influence employers have, not just on their employees, but on their employees’ families and on their entire communities. Employer support of safety initiatives can be far-reaching. Companies that make safety a priority tend to have employees who make safety a priority. What employees learn about safety—whether related to distracted, impaired, or fatigued driving, or the value of collision avoidance technologies in vehicles—goes home to their families and spreads beyond to the entire community. Employers already have made a positive difference in many areas of traffic safety and employers will be vital to the effort to achieve zero deaths on our roads.

 

For more information on motor vehicle safety at work, visit the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health website: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/motorvehicle/resources/crashdata/facts.html

 

 

 

Inspiring Youth Safety Leaders

By Nicholas Worrell, Chief, NTSB Safety Advocacy Division

As an NTSB safety advocate, I serve the American people by promoting safety improvements that will save lives, prevent injuries, and preserve property on the nation’s roadways. I work to end distracted and impaired driving, and I encourage greater use of seat belts and child restraint systems.

One way I get my advocacy message across is by speaking on safety issues. I recently attended the National Black Caucus of State Legislators (NBCSL) Annual Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana. The theme this year was “Racing Towards the Future: Leading in a Time of Change,” though, from a transportation safety perspective, it seems like the future is racing toward us. We are living in an age when everyone, everywhere is connected by technology. In the span of a decade, smartphones have gone from the hot new item to a staple of modern life. But to avoid tragedies, all of us must keep our hands, eyes, and minds on the road—especially our youth, who lack driving experience.

At the conference, I sat on a panel with NBCSL corporate roundtable (CRT) members to address students from Warren Central High School in Indianapolis. Our goal was to educate, empower, and engage the youth on a variety of topics. From my perspective, their race toward the future, and the future’s race toward them, are both givens; the challenge will be for them to lead during changing times. I spoke to them about the significance of making good decisions that would have a positive impact on their lives in years to come. I stressed to them that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers, killing more young people every year than suicide, drugs, violence, and alcohol abuse combined. In the last decade, more than 51,000 people between the ages of 15 and 20 died in traffic crashes. That’s nearly 100 people each week! My message, then, was for these youth to act intentionally; to think about consequences up front. Not only are those good leadership habits, but they’re also excellent safe driving strategies.

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Nicholas Worrell with Warren Central High School Principal Rich Shepler and students

I encouraged the audience members to become leaders among their peers. Fatigue, impaired driving, and distracted driving are all factors that can endanger young drivers’ lives. A big part of racing towards the future is bringing about widespread change at a pace that matches other changes coming about—like curbing distracted driving at a clip that keeps up with the developing technology. Keeping up with these changes will take time and commitment, and will require three things: good education and outreach, good laws, and good enforcement.

NBCSL 2
Nicholas Worrell joins National Black Caucus of State Legislators corporate roundtable members with Warren Central High School students

The race toward the future must be a race on the Road to Zero Fatalities; however, racing toward the future is more than giving teens a driver’s license or a car. As the CRT members discussed at the conference, today’s teens must meet tomorrow’s challenges with values like responsibility, commitment, passion, initiative, focus, action, persistence, growth, character, goals, gratitude, servitude, and courage, among other things. Racing toward the future will require a great deal of toil, and our youth will benefit from applying the lessons learned before them. Along with my colleagues on the panel, I offered my best advice and my own story to help guide them.

In 2016, we lost more than 37,000 lives on our nation’s roads. As we race toward 2018, what changes will we make to help prevent accidents, injuries, and fatalities? What steps can each of us take to prepare our youth for a brighter future? What stepping stones can we lay for students like those at Warren Central High?

Whether you teach students, mentor younger colleagues, or serve as an example to children, younger family members, or your peers, you, too, can lead during a time of change. The future is racing toward us; the time to prepare the next generation is now.