What Baseball Can Teach Us about Building a Safety Culture

By Debbie Hersman

I talked about the national pastime in a speech I gave today to the Air National Guard’s Executive Safety Summit.

Albert Pujols
St. Louis Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols

In ten years, Albert Pujols, first baseman of the St. Louis Cardinals, has never hit below .300, never had fewer than 100 RBIs, and never hit fewer than 30 home runs. Yes, number 5 has talent, but he works at it. It’s interesting to see the parallels between what Pujols does and what organizations can do to build a strong safety culture.

One, it starts at the top. Just like Pujols focuses on a single goal — winning the World Series — the organization must place top priority on achieving and maintaining a strong safety culture. Commitment and responsibility start at the top.

Two, to have a strong safety culture you must work at it, like number 5. Pujols has a disciplined workout routine. For example, on Monday, he does one set of exercises. On Tuesday, it’s another set to focus on another set of muscles. And so on. As for his game, Pujols works hard at that, too. He takes 15,000 to 20,000 practice swings a year.

Similarly, an organization needs a well-defined and rigorous safety program, such as a safety management system. Safety Management Systems (SMS) enable organizations to identify and manage risk and to have processes that enable them to manage risk far better than before. The discipline and standardization from an SMS sets the stage for the culture to follow.

Three, in a strong safety culture, there is a commitment, and there are mechanisms, to keep learning. Just as Pujols makes it a point to learn from players he admires, an organization needs to keep learning — not just from mistakes, but from others, and from detecting trends. This is why data gathering programs are so important. This is how you detect, and address, any weak links.

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